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Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was an English poet. Together with his friend William Wordsworth, Coleridge is often said to have started the Romantic movement in English literature. He was also a literary critic, philosopher and theologian. Coleridge wa ...

                                               

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy OM was an English novelist and poet. In the U.K. Hardy is generally thought to be one of the greatest figures in English literature. He lived in the Victorian era.

                                               

Dick King-Smith

Dick King-Smith, was an English author. He wrote many childrens books. The most popular was The Sheep-Pig. This book was called Babe the Gallant Pig in the United States. The book was made into the movie Babe.

                                               

Wilbert Awdry

The Reverend Wilbert Vere Awdry, OBE, was an English Anglican cleric, railway enthusiast, and childrens author. Simply known as the Reverend W. Awdry, he was the creator of Thomas the Tank Engine, the central figure in his acclaimed Railway Serie ...

                                               

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth, England. His parents were John Dickens 1785-1851, a naval pay clerk, and Elizabeth Barrow 1789–1863. When Dickens was born he had a rare disorder meaning he could not read or write properly like other kids. ...

                                               

Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey

Henry Howard was born in Hunsdon, Hertfordshire in 1517, during the reign of Henry VIII. His father was Thomas Howard. His mother was Elizabeth Stafford. He took the title of Earl of Surrey in 1524. Today he is known chiefly under that name. In 1 ...

                                               

Catharine Macaulay

Catharine Macaulay was an English historian. Between 1763 and 1783 Macaulay wrote her biggest work, The History of England from the Accession of James I to that of the Brunswick Line. Her 1790 work Letters on Education deeply influenced Mary Woll ...

                                               

Siegfried Sassoon

Siegfried Sassoon was an English poet and novelist, who became widely known as a result of a protest against the First World War that he made in 1917.

                                               

H. G. Wells

Herbert George Wells was an English author. He was born in Bromley, Kent. He wrote about 50 books. He was one of the inventors of science fiction, and also wrote novels and utopias. He wrote books such as The Invisible Man, The Time Machine, The ...

                                               

John Foxe

Foxe was born in Boston, Lincolnshire, England into a prominent family. In 1535 Foxe was admitted to Magdalen College School. He became a fellow in July 1539. Foxe resigned from his college in 1545, after referring to it as "a prison." During his ...

                                               

John Smith (explorer)

John Smith was a English soldier, explorer, and author. Smith was a leader of the first settlements at the Virginia Colony in 1608-1609. He explored the rivers of Virginia and the Chesapeake Bay and drew a map of the Chesapeake Bay area and New E ...

                                               

John Wesley

John Wesley was one of the founders of the Methodist church. He was an Anglican minister and Christian theologian. He was an early leader in the Methodist movement. Wesleys life had three distinct phases. The first at Oxford University with the f ...

                                               

Kingsley Amis

Sir Kingsley William Amis was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. He wrote more than twenty novels, three collections of poetry, short stories, radio and television scripts, and books of social and literary criticism. He was the fathe ...

                                               

Mrs Beeton

Mrs Beeton was known around the world as Mrs Beeton. She was the English author of Mrs Beetons Book of Household Management, and is one of the most famous cookbook writers.

                                               

Enid Blyton

Enid Blyton was an English author. She was born in Dulwich, South London, England. She was one of the worlds most famous childrens writers. She is also one of the most prolific authors of all time. Her most famous stories are the Famous Five stor ...

                                               

Robert Browning

Robert Browning was an English poet and playwright of Victorian era. He was born in Camberwell, London. He was married to the poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning. They both moved to Italy and lived in Florence. He had one son. Browning died in Venice ...

                                               

Lord Byron

George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron was an English peer, nobleman, politician, and poet. He was christened George Gordon Byron, but changed his name later in life. He adopted the surname Noel, so he that could inherit half his mother-in-laws est ...

                                               

John Keats

John Keats was an English poet. He is often ranked as one of the five most important poets of the Romantic movement in English literature; the other four are William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Thoug ...

                                               

Dorothy Kilner

Dorothy Kilner was an English writer of childrens books during the late 18th century. Dorothy published her first books anonymously. She then published under the pseudonyms M. P. and Mary Pelham. This was common practice among female authors in t ...

                                               

Doris Lessing

Doris Lessing was a British writer. In 2007, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Reporters told Doris that she had won the Nobel prize and they asked her "Are you not surprised?". She said she had already "won every other European lite ...

                                               

Beatrix Potter

Helen Beatrix Potter was an English writer, illustrator, mycologist and conservationist. She is famous for writing childrens books with animal characters such as The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Potter was born in Kensington, London. Her family was quit ...

                                               

John Ruskin

John Ruskin was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era. He was also an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist. He was hugely influential in the last half of the 19th century, up to the ...

                                               

Mary Wollstonecraft

Mary Wollstonecraft was a British writer. She was born in Spitalfields, a daughter of a rich farmer who inherited his fortune. Her father was known because he was sometimes violent towards her, her four siblings, and their mother when his farms f ...

                                               

Thomas Henry Huxley

Thomas Henry Huxley PC PRS was an English biologist who specialised in comparative anatomy. He was born in Ealing, Middlesex. He was a friend and supporter of Charles Darwin, and had a public career. He was a member of ten Royal Commissions. Toda ...

                                               

Mary Wilson, Baroness Wilson of Rievaulx

Gladys Mary Wilson, Lady Wilson of Rievaulx was an English poet. She was the widow of Harold Wilson, who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid- to late-1960s and mid-1970s. Her birth name was Gladys Mary Baldwin. In 1970 her v ...

                                               

Lisa Jardine

From 1990 to 2011, she was Centenary Professor of Renaissance Studies and Director of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters at Queen Mary, University of London. From 2008 to January 2014 she was Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology ...

                                               

George Crabbe

George Crabbe was an English poet and naturalist. His poem The Borough which describes life in a small town in Suffolk, inspired Benjamin Britten to compose his opera Peter Grimes.

                                               

Edward Gibbon

Edward Gibbon was an English historian and Member of Parliament. His most important work, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, was published in six volumes between 1776 and 1788. The Decline and Fall is known for the quality a ...

                                               

Aldous Huxley

Aldous Leonard Huxley was an English writer, and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. He wrote a number of novels, on various themes. Most of his books are about modern society, the effects of modern science and, later, ...

                                               

Thomas Robert Malthus

The Rev. Thomas Robert Malthus FRS, was a British writer on political economy and population. Malthus popularised the economic theory of rent, and was the first to use the phrase struggle for existence.

                                               

P.G. Wodehouse

P.G. Wodehouse, in full Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse was an English comic novelist, short-story writer and playwright, best known as the creator of the Jeeves character and series of novels. He was born in Guildford, Surrey. He died of a heart ...

                                               

Anne Bronte

Anne Bronte was an English writer and poet. She is best known for writing Agnes Grey and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. Anne was born on 17 January 1820 in Thornton, Yorkshire, England. She was the daughter of Patrick and Marie Bronte and the young ...

                                               

Charlotte Bronte

Charlotte Bronte was an English novelist and poet. She first published her works, including Jane Eyre, under the pseudonym false name of Currer Bell. In 1846, Charlotte encouraged her sisters to print Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell. They ...

                                               

Albert Goldfield

The Albert Goldfield is an area of 1300 square kilometres where gold was discovered in the outback of New South Wales in 1880. Gold was found at Mount Browne, which is 53 km south west of Tibooburra. There were other finds at Good Friday, Easter ...

                                               

Geographical Names Board of New South Wales

The Geographical Names Board of New South Wales is the official organization that records details of places and geographical names in New South Wales, Australia. It was set up in 1966. The Board has nine members.

                                               

Great Dividing Range

The Great Dividing Range, or the Eastern Highlands, is Australias largest mountain range. It is the fifth longest land-based range in the world. The range is 3.500 kilometres in length and runs along the whole east coast of Australia. In the nort ...

                                               

Greater Blue Mountains Area

The Greater Blue Mountains Area is a World Heritage Site in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales, Australia. It was added to the World Heritage List at meeting of the World Heritage Committee, held in Cairns in November 2000.

                                               

Arnhem Land

The Arnhem Land Region is one of the five regions of the Northern Territory of Australia. It is in the north east corner of the territory and is about 500km from the territory capital Darwin. It has an area of 97.000 km². This area includes Kakad ...

                                               

Gulf of Carpentaria

The Gulf of Carpentaria is a large, shallow sea surrounded on three sides by northern Australia. Its north edge is the Arafura Sea; the sea between Australia and New Guinea. At its mouth, the Gulf is 590 km wide, and further south, 675 km. The no ...

                                               

Tjunti

Tjunti is a soakage site near Kaḻṯukatjara, in the Northern Territory of Australia. It is where the Hull River cuts through the Petermann Ranges. It is about 36 kilometres to the southeast of Kaḻṯukatjara. Tjunti is the site where the famous gold ...

                                               

Cape York Peninsula

This article is about the peninsula in the Australian state of Queensland; not the Yorke Peninsula in South Australia, or Cape York, Greenland. Cape York Peninsula is a large remote peninsula in the far north of Queensland, Australia. It is the l ...

                                               

Cooper Creek

Cooper Creek is one of the most famous rivers in Australia. It is sometimes called the Barcoo River after one of its tributaries. It is one of three major Queensland river systems that flow into Lake Eyre. The water flow in Cooper Creek comes fro ...

                                               

North Queensland

North Queensland or the Northern Region is the northern part of the state of Queensland in Australia. It is just south of Far North Queensland. Queensland is a massive state and is larger than many countries. The tropical northern part of it has ...

                                               

Palm Island, Queensland

The island is 65 kilometres 40 mi north-west of Townsville, on the east coast of Queensland, Australia. It is the biggest of the Greater Palm group of islands. It has small bays, sandy beaches and steep forested mountains rising to 548 m 1.798 ft ...

                                               

Kangaroo Island

Kangaroo Island is Australias third-largest island after Tasmania and Melville Island. It is 112 kilometres 70 mi southwest of Adelaide in the state of South Australia. At its closest point to the mainland, it is 13 kilometres 8 miles offshore fr ...

                                               

Bass Strait

Bass Strait is a sea strait separating Tasmania from the south of the Australian mainland, specifically the state of Victoria. The strait was named after George Bass who travelled it in 1798. It is about 240 km wide at its narrowest point and gen ...

                                               

Derwent River

The Derwent is a river in Tasmania, Australia. It was named after the River Derwent, Cumbria, by British Commodore John Hayes who explored it in 1793. The name is Brythonic Celtic for "valley thick with oaks". John Hays placed the name "Derwent R ...

                                               

Tasman Peninsula

Tasman Peninsula is south and west of Forestier Peninsula. It is connected by a very narrow piece of land isthmus called Eaglehawk Neck. The Forestier Peninsula is joined to the rest of Tasmania by an isthmus called East Bay Neck, near the town o ...

                                               

French Island (Victoria)

French Island is a large island in Western Port, Victoria, Australia. It is 61 km southeast of Melbourne. In 1997 about 70 per cent of the island was made the French Island National Park. It has also been listed as part of the National Estate. In ...

                                               

Point Hicks

Point Hicks, once called Cape Everard, is a coastal headland on the east coast of Victoria, Australia. It is now a part of the Croajingolong National Park.