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Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the throne of Austria-Hungary, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, happened on 28 June 1914 in Sarajevo. They were shot dead by Gavrilo Princip. Princip was one ...

                                               

Big Bertha

Big Bertha is the name of a type of super-heavy howitzer made by the famous armaments manufacturer Krupp in Germany on the eve of World War I. Another huge gun, 42-cm Gamma-Device howitzer, was the forerunner of the Bertha.

                                               

Blockade of Germany

The blockade of Germany, during World War I, was a part of the First Battle of the Atlantic between the United Kingdom and Germany. The British established a naval blockade of Germany early in the war. As shown later in the Battle of Jutland, the ...

                                               

Chauchat

The Chauchat is a gun. It was the standard light machine gun or "machine rifle" of the French Army during World War I. Its official designation was Fusil Mitrailleur Modele 1915 CSRG ". Beginning in June 1916, it was placed into regular service w ...

                                               

Doughboy

Doughboy was a nickname given to the 85.000 American soldiers who fought in France during World War I. Their leader was John J. Pershing. The word "doughboy" was well known almost 100 years before World War I in Britain and America. Doughboy had ...

                                               

Duckboards

Duckboards are wooden walkways. They are usually put over muddy ground. Doing this means that people can walk on the dry duckboards instead of the muddy ground.

                                               

Infiltration tactics

Willy Rohr developed successful in 1915 the Shock-Troops-Taktiks in the Western Front. They had been used in the Battle of Verdun. His Bataillon became independent and was first named as Sturmbataillon Rohr and became about one year later renamed ...

                                               

Lewis gun

The Lewis gun was invented by U.S. Army colonel Isaac Newton Lewis in 1911, based on initial work by Samuel Maclean. The start of the First World War increased demand for the Lewis gun. BSA began production, under the name Model 1914. The design ...

                                               

Middle Eastern theatre of World War I

The Middle Eastern theatre of World War I was a large theatre during the first World War. Battles here were fought between the Allied Powers and the Central Powers. This theatre was the largest of all the theatres of WWI. It was made of four main ...

                                               

Ruhleben P.O.W. Camp

Ruhleben P.O.W. Camp was a camp near Berlin, Germany, where British prisoners of war were detained during World War I. Ruhleben itself was then a village 10 kilometres to the west of Berlin, but now it is part of the city of Berlin, in a district ...

                                               

Schlieffen Plan

The Schlieffen Plan was a strategic plan made by Count Alfred von Schlieffen, who worked for the German navy. It was made for the army of the German Empire in 1905. It was designed for a war between France on one side and the German Empire, Austr ...

                                               

Treaty of Versailles

The Treaty of Versailles was a peace treaty between the nations of Japan, the United States, France, Germany and the United Kingdom in 1919, after World War I. Germany, Austria and Hungary id not participate in writing the treaty. Germany had the ...

                                               

Western Front (World War I)

The Western Front was started by the German Army invading Luxembourg and Belgium at the beginning of World War I in 1914 and gaininf military control of many important industrial regions in France. Its quick advance was stopped by the Battle of t ...

                                               

World War I reparations

World War I reparations means the payments and transfers of property and equipment that Germany was forced to make after its defeat during World War I. Article 231 of the Treaty of Versailles the war guilt clause declared Germany and its allies r ...

                                               

World War I Victory Medal (United States)

The World War I Victory Medal is a service medal of the United States military which was first created in 1919, designed by James Earle Fraser. The medal was originally intended to be created due to an act of the United States Congress. It was in ...

                                               

20 July Plot

On 20 July 1944, Claus von Stauffenberg and other conspirators tried to assassinate Adolf Hitler, Fuhrer of Nazi Germany, inside his Wolfs Lair field headquarters near Rastenburg, East Prussia. The name Operation Valkyrie - originally referring t ...

                                               

Anti-submarine boom net (Sydney Harbour WWII)

The Anti-submarine boom net was used to stop enemy submarines entering Sydney Harbour during World War II. The net went all the way across the harbour from Green Point, Watsons Bay to Georges Head on the other side. The boom was part of the Sydne ...

                                               

Attack on Pearl Harbor

The Attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise attack by Japan against the neutral United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on the morning of December 7, 1941. It led the United States into World War II. Japan was planning a war in Southeast A ...

                                               

Bengal famine of 1943

The Bengal famine of 1943 was a famine in the Bengal province of British India during World War II. Between 2.1 and 3 million people died in the famine. They died mainly of starvation, malaria, and not having the right health care. The famine cau ...

                                               

Bletchley Park

Bletchley Park is an estate in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England. It was the site of the United Kingdoms main codebreaking team during World War II. Now, Bletchley Park is home to the National Codes Centre and The National Museum of Computi ...

                                               

The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas

The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas is a novel written by John Boyne. Brunos father is a commandant in World War II and the family moves house to Out-With so that he can work closer to concentration camps under the Furys orders. After staying there fo ...

                                               

British Home Guard

The British Home Guard was a defence organisation of the British Army during World War II. It was a secondary defence line. It was meant to stop invasion by Nazi forces. The Home Guard existed from 1940 to 1944. It was composed of one and a half ...

                                               

Celebrating the 75th anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War

Celebrating the 75th anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War - solemn and memorable events timed to the anniversary of the Victory of the Soviet Union in the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. Victory Day is the most significant holiday ...

                                               

Code talker

A code talker was a person who was hired by the United States military during wartime to use a little-known language as a means of secret communication. The term is now usually known with United States service members during the world wars who us ...

                                               

Eastern Front (World War II)

The Eastern Front during World War II was where the Axis countries and the Soviet Union fought. It began in 1941 with Operation Barbarossa and ended in 1945 by the Soviet soldiers capturing Berlin. Both the Axis countries and the Soviet Union had ...

                                               

Enigma machine

The Enigma machine was created for Germany by Arthur Scherbius in World War I. It is a cypher machine: a way of changing the letters of a message so that it appears to be scrambled letters. Each time a letter is typed, it appears as another lette ...

                                               

Fascism

Fascism is a far-right form of government in which most of the countrys power is held by one ruler. Fascist governments are usually totalitarian and authoritarian one-party states. Under fascism, the economy and other parts of society are heavily ...

                                               

First Motion Picture Unit

The First Motion Picture Unit, later 18th Army Air Forces Base Unit, was the movie production unit of the US Army Air Forces during World War II and was the first military unit made up of actors. It made more than 400 propaganda movies which were ...

                                               

Flying Tigers

The Flying Tigers was a group of American fighter pilots from the United States Army Air Force, the United States Navy, and the United States Marine Corps. Claire Lee Chennault commanded it.

                                               

Friedrich Kellner Diary

The Diary of Friedrich Kellner is a journal written during the Second World War. The author, August Friedrich Kellner, was a justice inspector in the courthouse in Mainz. He was also a political activist for the Social Democratic Party of Germany ...

                                               

George S. Patton slapping incidents

The George S. Patton slapping incidents refer to two events that involved an American general, George S. Patton. These happened during the World War II Allied campaign in Sicily. General Patton slapped two soldiers he thought were cowards who wer ...

                                               

IG Farben

IG Farben, was a group of German chemical companies formed in 1925. Farben is German for "paints", "dyes", or "colors". Initially most of these companies produced dyes, but soon began to do more advanced chemistry. The founding of IG Farben was a ...

                                               

Italian conquest of British Somali Coast Protectorate

The Italian conquest of the British Somali Coast Protectorate was an Italian campaign during World War II against the British Empire. It was the only Italian victory against the Allies that was won without help from Germany.

                                               

Italian resistance movement

The Italian resistance movement is a term for Italian resistance groups during World War II. It was against the forces of Nazi Germany as well as the Italian Social Republic between September 1943 and April 1945 Known as partisans Italian: partig ...

                                               

Kapo

A kapo or prisoner functionary was a special type of prisoner in the Nazi concentration camps during The Holocaust. Kapos were chosen by the Schutzstaffel camp guards to help run the camps. Some kapos were in charge of other prisoners, who had to ...

                                               

Massacres of Foibe

The Massacres of Foibe are the mass killings in which the majority of victims were ethnic Italians in 1943, after the capitulation of Italy on 8 September, and in 1945, when Yugoslav partisans under the command of Tito occupied parts of Venezia G ...

                                               

Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program

The Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program under the Civil Affairs and Military Government Sections of the Allied armies was created in 1943 to help protect cultural property in war areas during and after World War II. The group of about 400 ...

                                               

Norwegian heavy water sabotage

The Norwegian heavy water sabotage was a group of Allied missions in World War II. The target of the missions was the 60 megawatt Vemork power station. This power station produced a type of water that is named heavy water. Heavy water is based on ...

                                               

Occupation governments prison camps in Norway during World War Two

The occupation government built and used prison camps in Norway during World War Two. 709 prison camps were counted by a project, that was under advice by Randi Bratteli and some others; other numbers say "around 500" prison camps.

                                               

Phoney War

The Phoney War was a name for the months after Poland was defeated in September 1939 and before France was invaded in May 1940, during World War II. During this time, there were no big military operations in Europe. There was a British and French ...

                                               

Pointe du Hoc

Pointe du Hoc is a place in the Normandy in northern France. It has steep cliffs about 100 m high that drop down toward the sea and a very thin beach at the bottom that is underwater at high tide and dry at low tide. It was important during World ...

                                               

Potsdam Conference

The Potsdam Conference was a meeting of the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and the United States in Potsdam, Germany from July 17 to August 2, 1945. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, the President of the United States and the leader of ...

                                               

Quonset hut

A Quonset hut is a simple building made of steel and with the shape of a half-circle. Quonset huts are made at a factory and then later put together at their location. They use steel that is corrugated and galvanized. The Quonset hut was first de ...

                                               

Srbosjek

Srbosjek is the colloquial Croatian term for a type of knife used for killing prisoners in Croatian concentration camps in World War II.

                                               

Strategic bombing

Strategic bombing is a military strategy used to destroy the enemies economic ability to fight a war. It is an attack from the air. Strategic bombing missions usually attack targets such as factories, railroads, oil refineries and cities. Mission ...

                                               

Surrender of Japan

The surrender of Imperial Japan was announced by Japanese Emperor Hirohito on August 15 and formally signed on September 2, 1945. This ended World War II. By the end of July 1945, the Imperial Japanese Navy IJN was not able to carry major operati ...

                                               

Timeline of World War II

January 30: Nazi leader Adolf Hitler is appointed Chancellor of Germany. 1931- September 18: Japan invades the Manchuria region of China, starting Second Sino-Japanese War. March 23: The Reichstag passes Enabling Act, giving Hitler dictatorship p ...

                                               

Tripartite Pact

The Tripartite Pact, also called the Three-Power Pact, Axis Pact, Three-way Pact, or Tripartite Treaty was a pact signed in Berlin, Germany, on September 27, 1940, which set up the Axis Powers of World War II. On that date, it was signed by three ...

                                               

Victory Through Air Power (movie)

Victory Through Air Power is a 1943 Walt Disney Technicolor animated movie. It is based on the 1942 book Victory Through Air Power by Alexander P. de Seversky. De Seversky is in the movie. This was different from the Disney animated movies of the ...

                                               

We Can Do It!

We Can Do It! is an American wartime propaganda poster produced by J. Howard Miller in 1943 for Westinghouse Electric as an inspirational image to boost worker morale. It actively became popular in the 1980s feminist movement. The poster was very ...